TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION (TAR)

   
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 TAR - Contemporary "TIBET"

MAJESTIC MOUNTAINS, MYSTICAL RIVERS, MYSTERIOUS PEOPLE

                                                        
 
                                                     

 

 
   

TAR OVERVIEW

 
   
TAR DEFINITIONS  
The Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) is also called  Xizang Autonomous Region (Western part of China)




 


TAR (Tibet) - Chinese Definition

Tibet is comprised of the three provinces: Amdo (now split by China into the provinces of Qinghai, Gansu & Sichuan), Kham (largely incorporated into the Chinese provinces of Sichuan, Yunnan and Qinghai), and U-Tsang (which, together with western Kham, is today referred to by China as the Tibet Autonomous Region).

Sovereign Tibet Area - Pre 1951
The Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) comprises less than half of historic Tibet and was created by China in 1965 for administrative reasons. It is important to note that when Chinese officials and publications use the term "Tibet" they mean only the TAR.

Tibet - Tibetan Definition
Tibetans use the term Tibet to mean the three provinces described above, i.e., the area traditionally known as Tibet before the 1949-50 invasion

TAR PREFECTURES

 

The Tibetan Autonomous Region has seven administrative divisions known as Prefectures.

Lhasa (Municipality)
Nagqu
Nyingchi
Ngari
Qamdo
Shannan
Xigaze

 

TAR GEOGRAPHY

 
The TAR is considered a high altitude plateau with high altitude lakes, stunning peaks, and rushing rivers. The summers are short and the winters can be harsh. Most of the province is used for yak grazing on the hundreds of miles of open grasslands. Yaks live at high altitudes without problems, and surprisingly nomads manage as well.

International borders with Tibet (TAR) currently include:
India
Nepal
Sikkim
Bhutan
Myanmar/Burma

Internal borders with Tibet (TAR) include:
Sichuan
Yunnan
Qinghai
Xinjiang

 

 TAR POPULATION

 
Tibetan
There are a myriad of difficulties in assessing the true extent of Tibet's population. This is due to the extremely inaccessible terrain and general absence of fixed settlements such as nomadic communities which represent a sizeable proportion of the community. The Tibetan Government-in-Exile has estimated the Tibetan population inside traditional Tibet at 6.1 million (DIIR 1992). This figure was reaffirmed in 1988 by Huan Xiang, Director of the Centre for International Studies of the State Council in Beijing, when the Beijing Review quoted him as saying: "of the present population of six million Tibetans, only two million are living in Tibet ('TAR') while the remaining four million are in other provinces of China."

Chinese 
In 1952, Mao Zedong said: "There are hardly any Han (Chinese) in Tibet." On 25 September 1988, Mao Rubai, Vice-Chairman of the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR), said that there were a million Chinese in the TAR. In addition, the Tibetan Government-in-Exile has suggested that there could be upwards of 7.6 million Chinese settlers in all traditional Tibetan regions. In contrast, the Chinese 1990 census figures from The Present Population of the Tibetan Nationality in China (Zhang & Zhang 1994) claim the total non-Tibetan population to be approximately 4.2 million and the total Tibetan population to be 4.59 million. With the difficulty of conducting a comprehensive, independent census in Tibet, it is extremely difficult to give any precise picture of its population profile.



 

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