LANGUAGE OF TIBET

   
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EXPLORING TIBET
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TIBETAN DIALECTS
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LANGUAGES IN TIBET (TAR) AND TIBETAN AREAS IN CHINA

Though the official language of Tibet is Chinese, Tibetans use their own language, the Tibetan language, known as bod-yig in Tibet inhabited areas. It is spoken in Tibet, Bhutan, Nepal, and in parts of northern India such as Sikkim. It belongs to the Tibeto-Burman branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family. Interestingly, as in India and other parts of the globe, spoken Tibetan includes numerous regional dialects which, in many cases, are not mutually intelligible. It is likely that there are dozens if not hundreds of variations, accents, etc., but according to geographical divisions, there are three major local dialects: Weizang, Kang and Amdo. The first two dialects have their own tones in pronunciation while the latter do not. The commonly called greater Tibetans language is spoken by approximately 6 million people across the Tibetan Plateau and another 150,000 exile speakers who have fled from modern-day Tibet to India and other countries. Take a good look at Tibetan script. It flows like a warm dance, it's peaceful and artistic unlike the hard, squarest, cold Chinese. Study the flow, the rhythm and ribbons of Tibetan script and after you visit and get to know the people you will understand why their written language is so different from other Asian languages. "When peacefulness abides in the heart, it flows from the fingers." The writing script of Tibetan language was formed in early 7th century and is based on the ancient Sanskrit language of India. Tibetan language consists of thirty consonant, four vowels, five inverted letters (for the renting of foreign words) and the punctuations. Sentences are written from right to the left. With two major written scripts namely the regular script and the cursive hand, Tibetan language is widely used in all areas inhabited by Tibetans.

   

English to Tibetan Online Dictionary

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courtesy of http://eng-tib.zanwat.org/

   
   
   


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
       

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