KHASA (ZHANGMU)

   
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KHASA

"ON THE ROAD AGAIN, I JUST CAN'T WAIT TO GET ON THE ROAD AGAIN..." 

   
   
KHASA  
Zhangmu is known by its Tibetan name Khasa. This town lies in the southern region of Himalayas about 776 kilometers away from the capital, Lhasa. Construction of the 125 kilometer Kodari highway linking Khasa with Kathmandu in the early 1960's boosted trade ties. Heavy trucks replaced traditional porters, and days-long brutal voyages through rugged mountain terrains were substituted by less than a four-hour drive. Although every place is interesting, most tourists don't stay in Khasa for long. Bordering Nepal to the south, it has been one of the key routes of trans-Himalayan trade between China and Nepal since time immemorial. It's a convenient starting point for Mt. Everest climbers and is situated in a scenic area with a semi-temperate climate. The surrounding woods have waterfalls, pine trees and flowers, but keep the humidity and bugs in mind during the hot months.

Khasa has a very colorful bazaar that stays busy morning till night crowded with bargaining tourists and businessmen. This may be the only place in Tibet where you can buy Tibetan, Chinese and Nepalese products at the same place. Four decades after the Kodari highway project, Khasa, newly named Zangmo/Zhangmu by the Chinese, is far
more than a popular hub for trans-Himalayan trade. China's policy of  "vast economic liberalization" in the 1980s has made this a boom town of trade, including a safe haven for the flesh trade.

Within the bar district in the Khasa Bazaar, the twinkling bulbs lure the knowing into dens of desire while others look away and enjoy the regular bars and restaurants right alongside. Like Lhasa, the Chinese girls who run and work these brothels are not bothered by the government. FYI- AIDS and STD's are rumored to be rampant in China.

Still, Khasa is a great place to find supplies and gear for your trip to the magnificent mountains nearby. Steer clear of the twinkling lights and stay healthy!

   

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 
       

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